Book Review: Carlos Santana: Sound of the Heart, Song of the World by Gary Golio, illustrated by Rudy Gutierrez

 

Review by Lila Quintero Weaver

DESCRIPTION OF THE  BOOK: Carlos Santana grew up surrounded by music. Carlos’s father, a beloved mariachi performer, begins teaching his son how to play violin at an early age. But when Carlos later discovers American blues, he is captivated by the raw honesty of the music. Unable to think of anything else, he loses all interest in the violin and for a time, loses his way as well. Only after receiving an electric guitar of his own does he find his true life’s path.

From his early exposure to mariachi music to his successful fusing of rock, blues, jazz, and Latin influences, here is the childhood story of a legendary musician.

MY TWO CENTS: The magazine Rolling Stone places Carlos Santana within the pantheon of rock music’s greatest guitarists. But to put some perspective on his contribution as a Chicano, he was among the first to fuse blues-rock with Latinx instruments and rhythms, sometimes accompanied by lyrics in Spanish. In the mostly white world of rock and roll, Santana’s Latinidad stood in sharp relief, and his rise came at a time when Latinx performing artists rarely achieved notoriety on a national scale. Santana broke through this wall of invisibility. He did it by offering the world a sound that could not be ignored.

How did it all begin?

A captivating picture-book biography for readers of any age, Carlos Santana: Sound of the Heart, Song of the World brings us the background story. Told in poetic prose, the narrative opens in the subject’s infancy and follows the early years of his musical development, culminating in the moment when his love for blues-rock ignites.

One of this book’s greatest strengths is the art of Rudy Gutierrez, whose high-powered illustrations explode with movement and color. Page spreads vibrate with psychedelic swirls, suggesting the fluidity and intensity in Santana’s music.

Born in 1947 in Autlán de Navarro, Jalisco, Mexico—a town of “dirt roads and mud houses”—Santana’s humble beginnings do not hold him back for long. Thanks to wise and loving parents, he receives rich exposure to music. His father, José Santana, is a bandleader in the mariachi tradition. Carlos seems destined to follow his father’s career path, but then discovers a musical expression that speaks to him far more convincingly.

As a child, Carlos looks on his father with great admiration. “When Papá plays the violin, even little Carlos can see how people’s eyes light up, filled with el espíritu de la vida. Everyone wants José Santana to entertain them on their special days, and Carlos believes his father is an angel, flying on a bicycle with his golden harp as he rides to play in the church orchestra.”

At home, José is the younger Santana’s violin instructor. Unfortunately, “Carlos doesn’t really like the violin, and the smell of wood, held close to his face, gives him no pleasure.” In an effort to expand his son’s possibilities, José takes Carlos to the cantinas where he plays, offering the budding violinist time on the stage. Yet for Carlos, something important is missing in these occasions: joy.

But everything changes once he hears American blues guitarists on the radio. “Names like Muddy Waters and B.B. King seem magical, their songs raw and honest.” After this critical discovery, clashes between father and son become more frequent, especially when Carlos tries to sneak a bit of blues-style improvisation into a mariachi performance. Eventually, José leaves Mexico to pursue better paying gigs in the United States. With his father gone, Carlos finds a bit of breathing room to indulge his musical tastes.

Then, unexpectedly, a package arrives from San Francisco. It’s a used electric guitar! Coming from his father, this gift sends a profoundly affirming message. “There will be no turning back. Now [Carlos] can start to play the song inside him, the one that has been there all along.”

The book’s closing paragraph hints at the brilliant career that lies beyond the scope of this story. “Young Carlos Santana will create a new flavor of rock and roll, charged with Latin passion and the raw honesty of American blues.”

TEACHING TIPS: For a broader understanding of Santana’s significance in the history of rock and roll, check the back pages of the book, which include a “More About Carlos Santana” section, a brief list of discography, as well as Internet and print sources for further information. See also this article on the PBS website.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Gary Golio is a visual artist, a child therapist, and the author of numerous other picture-book biographies, whose subjects include Billie Holiday, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, and John Coltrane. Learn more about his work on his official website.

 

 

 

ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATOR: Rudy Gutierrez is the distinguished creator behind the cover art for Santana’s multiplatinum album Shaman and the recently released In Search of Mona Lisa. He also illustrated a U.S. postage stamp in commemoration of Jimi Hendrix. Learn more about Gutierrez in this interview.

 

 

 

 

ABOUT THE REVIEWER: Lila Quintero Weaver is the author of My Year in the Middle, a middle-grade novel published in 2018 by Candlewick Press. She’s also the writer-illustrator of Darkroom: A Memoir in Black & WhiteDarkroom recounts Lila’s experiences as a child immigrant from Argentina to Alabama during the tumultuous 1960s. The Spanish edition is now available, under the title Cuarto oscuro: Recuerdos en blanco y negro.  Learn more about Lila on her website, and follow her on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Review: The Last 8 by Laura Pohl

 

Reviewed by Katrina Ortega

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOKClover Martinez has always been a survivor, which is the only reason she isn’t among the dead when aliens invade and destroy Earth as she knows it. When Clover hears an inexplicable radio message, she’s shocked to learn there are other survivors—and that they’re all at the former Area 51. When she arrives, she’s greeted by a band of misfits who call themselves The Last Teenagers on Earth. Only they aren’t the ragtag group of heroes Clover was expecting. The group seems more interested in hiding than fighting back, and Clover starts to wonder if she was better off alone. But then she finds a hidden spaceship, and she doesn’t know what to believe…or who to trust.

MY TWO CENTS: The Last 8 is a solid science fiction read. For those who are passionate about sci-fi, the book presents a really enticing plot that keeps the reader on the edge of their seats. Readers are taken on a journey with Clover and forced to contend with the mysterious beings that have taken over the planet and decimated all forms of life (with the exception of a tiny population of which Clover is a member). Clover can find no way of killing them, and is completely clueless as to why they do not seem to notice her, even though they’ve obliterated every other living thing around her.

Her arrival at Area 51, six months after the initial contact with these otherworldly beings, introduces her to a seemingly random group of other teens who, like her, pass unnoticed by these violent beings. This group of teens, as it turns out, may not be as random as the reader thinks (but I won’t give any spoilers!). The plot is a pretty solid suspense ride, with thrills heightening as these teens try to figure out a way to overcome these new alien overlords.

The best thing about this book is Clover. Clover is a complicated and well-formed character.

She highlights a number of really interesting qualities that are not often explored in YA (or any) literature. First, though it’s never delved deeply into, she seems to be a character who is not immediately looking for romance or any sort of sexual relationship (i.e. Clover is aromantic/asexual – it’s never blatantly stated, but heavily implied). The reader comes to understand her complicated relationship with her ex-boyfriend, as one that Clover was appreciative of because she is able to appreciate people in her life without it needing to be about romance or sex.

Additionally, throughout her journey to Area 51, Clover goes through periods of serious helplessness and severe depression to the point that she realistically contemplates suicide. I find it refreshing that Pohl is up-front about Clover’s feelings as she travels through the country for the six months between the initial alien contact and her arrival at Area 51.

Another great thing about this book is that it involves a large and diverse cast. The readers see young people who come from all areas of this country, and even from abroad. There is a great variety of ethnicities and sexual identities. I appreciate that this is becoming more common in YA literature, but an example like this one, where the characters are intersectionally diverse (ethnically and sexually diverse at the same time) is particularly admirable.

While an overall good start to this series, there are a couple of weaker points. First, though it’s made clear that Clover has been flying planes for a large part of her life and that she is genetically designed to be better at this than any other living being on Earth, it was still hard to wrap my head around the idea that she’s not only adept at flying very high-level military grade aircrafts, but that she’s so adept she can fly several different ones with no training whatsoever. Now, I completely understand that this can be explained by the idea that she’s not entirely human and therefore has superhuman capabilities, but it was still a stretch for me.

Lastly, the ending was not only confusing, but it seemed very rushed and slapped together. This is particularly unfortunate because Pohl spends a good amount of time really building up the middle portion of the book. It would have been worthwhile to focus on continuing that trend through the rest of the novel.

Overall, though, this was a great read, and I’m excited to see what happens in the second book of this duology!

TEACHING TIPS: The Last 8 was a thoroughly entertaining read, and any lover of sci-fi or adventure novels would find it a fast and fun read.

This book’s greatest teaching points come from the conversations about relationships and mental health that the book encourages. I love that many YA writers make it a point to destigmatize the diversity of these two things and challenge the ways readers might think about these topics. Honestly, if you think about the situation that Clover finds herself in, it is plain that anyone would be overcome with a sense of hopelessness and loss. Pohl’s description of Clover’s thought processes is legitimate and accurate and can be a great way to begin having conversations about what loneliness and depression are and how both can affect our mental health.

The book also brings to light relationships and individuals that are healthy and diverse. Clover’s relationships with her grandparents, her ex-boyfriend, and her newfound group of friends illustrate how vastly different relationships can look. Additionally, Clover’s character is one that is in charge of the interactions that she wants to have with people. She’s open and honest about how she feels, romantically or friendship-wise, and that is absolutely something that should be explored more in conversations with youth and adults.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR (from Author’s Website): Laura Pohl is a YA writer and the author of THE LAST 8 (Sourcebooks, 2019). She likes writing messages in caps lock, quoting Hamilton and obsessing about Star Wars. When not taking pictures of her dog, she can be found curled up with a fantasy or science-fiction book. A Brazilian at heart and soul, she makes her home in São Paulo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

FullSizeRenderABOUT THE REVIEWER: Katrina Ortega (M.L.I.S.) is the Young Adult Librarian at the Hamilton Grange Branch of the New York Public Library. Originally from El Paso, Texas, she has lived in New York City for six years. She is a strong advocate of continuing education (in all of its forms) and is very interested in learning new ways that public libraries can provide higher education to all. She is also very interested in working with non-traditional communities in the library, particularly incarcerated and homeless populations. While pursuing her own higher education, she received two Bachelors of Arts degrees (in English and in History), a Masters of Arts in English, and a Masters of Library and Information Sciences. Katrina loves reading most anything, but particularly loves literary fiction, YA novels, and any type of graphic novel or comic. She’s also an Anglophile when it comes to film and TV, and is a sucker for British period pieces. In her free time, if she’s not reading, Katrina loves to walk around New York, looking for good places to eat.

Book Review: Planting Stories: The Life of Librarian and Storyteller Pura Belpré / Sembrando Historias: Pura Belpré bibliotecaria y narradora de cuentos

 

  Planting in Spanish

Review by Dora M. Guzmán

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK: Follow la vida y el legado of Pura Belpré, the first Puerto Rican librarian in New York City.

When she came to America in 1921, Pura carried the cuentos folkloricos of her Puerto Rican homeland. Finding a new home at the New York Public Library as a bilingual assistant, she turned her popular retellings into libros and spread seeds across the land. Today, these seeds have grown into a lush landscape as generations of children and storytellers continue to share her tales and celebrate Pura’s legacy.

This portrait of the influential librarian, author, and puppeteer reminds us of the power of storytelling and the extraordinary woman who opened doors and championed bilingual literature.

MY TWO CENTS: Another bilingual favorite to add to the informational biography shelf! Pura Belpré is widely known for the book award created in her honor through the American Library Association. Every year, the Pura Belpré Award is one that recognizes Latinx authors and illustrators that reflect the Latinx culture in their picture books or novels.

Pura Belpré had seeds of determination and passion that followed her from Puerto Rico. That same blessing led her to work in a library and share her stories with children, however, she quickly discovered that many of her own stories, reflective of her Puerto Rican culture, were not readily available to the community. Therefore, she begins to share her stories with children and then begins to write down all her stories for others to read. Soon after, she is telling her stories all around the world. This biographical account of Pura’s life story and life’s work is nothing short of inspirational. Pura unequivocally shares her passion for storytelling to all so that her stories and culture are not lost. Despite losing her best friend and husband, she returns to the library scene while also inspiring others, and sees her seeds of storytelling and Latinx culture, come to fruition.

The sentence structures are concise but impactful as they tell the story, almost in a poetic form, of inspiration and passion as Pura moves to a role within the library. The reader is mesmerized in her storytelling and how certain words stand out with the use of a brushstroke. Words and phrases in Spanish are realistically embraced within the narrative structure, so much that it flows and might go unnoticed. The sharp, bold, multicolored background brings life to the determining force behind Pura’s life and purpose with books and libraries. The illustrator perfectly captures the authenticity of the story through its detailed illustrations and placement of characters and scenes. The illustrations dance around the entire page, which keeps the reader involved as the story progresses. Certain illustrations, like the simple flowers and musical notes, follow Pura as she shares her stories across the pages. The additional final pages also provide extensive references to text and film for further research in Pura’s lifework, as well as Latinx culture, especially the Puerto Rican culture.

Overall, a perfect addition, in both English and Spanish, to your biography shelf, especially highlighting the power of small, yet meaningful actions and how it evolves into a movement across Latinx and book cultures.

TEACHING TIPS: Many of these teaching moments can be implemented in a grades K-5 setting, with a focus on the primary grades.

  • Teaching descriptive vocabulary words and phrases
  • Focus on character traits, especially traits describing Pura throughout the story
  • Focus on the illustrator’s purpose of using certain colors or placement of illustrations to convey meaning
  • This book can also be combined in a biographical unit of inspirational storytellers or librarians.
  • Students can also be invited to research more of Pura Belpré’s lifework, as well as the impact of the Pura Belpré award on books.

To learn more about the Pura Belpré Medal and find the latest winners and honors, check out the ALA’s Pura Belpré Award home page.

Anika Denise Author Hi-res PhotoABOUT THE AUTHOR: Anika Aldamuy Denise first heard the stories of Pura Belpré from her titi Rose, who, like Pura’s family, enjoyed sharing the treasured folklore of Puerto Rico. Today, Anika is the celebrated author of several picture books, including Starring Carmen!, Lights, Camera, Carmen!, and Monster Trucks. She lives with her husband and three daughters in Rhode Island. Other new titles coming in 2019 include The Best Part of Middle illustrated by Christopher Denise, and The Love Letter illustrated by Lucy Ruth Cummins.Visit her online at www.anikadenise.com.

 

 

ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATOR: Paola Escobar grew up traveling from town to town in Colombia. From a very young age she liked to draw the stories her grandmother Clara told about her ancestors, the countryside, and animals. Today, Paola is an illustrator who is passionate about telling stories of her own, having published with SM Spain, Planeta, Norma, and more. She lives very happily in Bogota, Colombia, with her husband and their dog, Flora. Follow her on Instagram here!

 

img_0160ABOUT THE REVIEWER: Dora M. Guzmán is a bilingual reading specialist for grades K-3 and also teaches an undergraduate college course in Children’s Literature. When she is not sharing her love of reading with her students, you can find her in the nearest library, bookstore, or online, finding more great reads to add to her never ending “to read” pile!

 

Book review: Por ahí viene el huracán: Una aventura de Isa y Mau

 

We don’t often publish reviews or articles exclusively in Spanish, but since the picture book reviewed below is not yet available in English, it seems sensible to direct this post to readers of Spanish. To be clear, we do hope for an eventual English edition. After all, Por ahí viene el huracán is an authentic depiction of a child’s experience of Hurricane María, written and illustrated by Puerto Ricans with close knowledge of what the storm did to their island and their people. We hope it will find expression in multiple languages!

Readers on the mainland may order copies of this edition at Libros787.com. 

Reseña por Sujei Lugo y Lila Quintero Weaver

POR AHÍ VIENE EL HURACÁN: Una aventura de Isa y Mau es escrito por Laura Rexach Olivencia e ilustrado por Mya Pagán. (Editorial Destellos, 2018)

El impacto del Huracán María el pasado septiembre de 2017, marcó fuertemente la vida y experiencias de diversas comunidades en Puerto Rico y la diáspora. Lxs niñxs no estuvieron exentos del impacto psicológico, físico, natural, y social del fenómeno atmosférico y sus vidas y experiencias son igual de válidas. Varias personas se han dado la tarea de documentar y representar el paso e impacto del huracán a través de las letras, la música y el arte. Entre estos tenemos varios libros de literatura infantil y juvenil. Uno de ellos lo es Por ahí viene el huracán escrito por Laura Rexach Olivencia e ilustrado por Mya Pagán.

Aunque el nombre del huracán no es mencionado, detalles dentro de la historia y la fecha de publicación nos pueden indicar que se trata del Huracán María. “El último no vino. Pero dicen que este sí que viene.” Frase que se repetía luego del Huracán Irma y a la llegada del Huracán María.

La historia es contada desde la perspectiva de una niña llamada Isa y sus conversaciones con su gato Mau. Isa espera con ansias la hora de salida ya que al otro día no habría clase debido al posible paso de un huracán. Al llegar a la casa, Isa conversa como su gato Mau sobre la necesidad de prepararse ante el posible impacto del huracán. Toda la familia está trabajando para preparar la casa, sus pertenencias y organizar los suplidos necesarios. Isa observa cómo los vecinos y la comunidad anda de lado a lado comprando materiales, alimentos, artículos de primera necesidad y como todos cargan las mismas cosas, baterías, agua, latas, velas y linternas. La abuela también los acompaña en la casa y todos se quedarán en el mismo cuarto, algo que le emociona a Isa porque cree que es un “pijama party”, sensación que muchos también sentimos durante nuestra niñez.

Tan pronto comienzan los vientos, se va la luz, lo que causa que muchos en la casa despierten por el calor, el ruido del viento o simplemente, ansiedad. Su abuela Lela, como cariñosamente la llama Isa, intenta calmar a la niña pero Isa no logra recuperar el sueño. La familia de Isa tuvo que levantarse para reforzar los paneles en las ventanas debido a los fuertes vientos y lluvia. Los ruidos que se escuchaban eran aterradores, que hasta los adultos del hogar siente miedo, algo que Isa nunca había visto a su padre sentir. ¡Qué eternidad!, expresan. Sentimiento que fue expresado constantemente al describir el huracán. Recuerdo mensajes recibidos y leídos de lo “eterno que se sentía”, “esto no para”, “esto es el día más largo de mi vida”.   

Al otro día el sonido del viento fue disminuyendo y la calma fue regresando. Isa ayuda en la casa secando y controlando el agua que está entrando a la misma. El barrio y los caminos están clausurados por troncos de árboles, postes caídos, puentes derrumbados y pasan seis días atrapados, muy cercano a la realidad vivida en Puerto Rico. Una imagen presenta un camión de la Guardia Nacional o Fuerzas Armadas, y el texto narra cómo un grupo de soldados llegaron a su vecindario a ayudar, algo que no muchas personas vivieron post Huracán María.

El libro ilustrado es bastante certero en plasmar lo que se vivió luego de María, las filas interminables para agua, gasolina, alimentos. El desespero que se vivió y que algunos aún viven. Muchas personas perdieron sus hogares, familiares, trabajos y cotidianidad, que fueron desplazados y se trasladaron a vivir a los Estados Unidos. Isa observa que su amigo Nico, es uno de los miles de niños que tuvieron que mudarse e Isa siente una tristeza sobre algunas de las consecuencias del impacto del huracán.

“Llega el mes de noviembre y la escuela del pueblo sigue cerrada porque aún no llega la electricidad”. Las escuelas fueron unos de los lugares más impactados por María, algunos aún funcionaban como refugio, otros como cocinas y espacios comunitarios, otras sufrieron daños en la infraestructura y otras fueron eventualmente cerradas. Al igual que Isa, muchas familias y comunidades crearon “una nueva rutina diaria.” Isa reflexiona sobre su amigo Nico que tuvo que irse, sobre el cierre de su escuela y como está deseosa que tanto Nico y la escuela vuelvan a su vida. Entre preocupación y esperanza, Isa vuelve a sentir vida en su barrio.

El texto es simple, honesto y captura la esencia de los personajes, el ambiente que reina antes, durante y luego de un fenómeno atmosférico sin ser condescendiente con los lectores. Se puede sentir la voz y experiencia de las personas que realmente pasaron por este desastre natural y proveen una visión auténtica de la historia. Los detalles, el vocabulario, la vestimenta y otras imágenes capturan algunas de las experiencias y realidades puertorriqueñas.

La autora incorpora el uso de onomatopeyas de diversos sonidos como el desagüe en la bañera, la vieja mecedora, el silencio, los martillazos en la pared, los zapatos caminando, el sonido aterrador del viento, los ladridos del perro, los cuchillos para cortar vegetales, el suave cantar de la brisa y el cantar del coquí. A través de las onomatopeyas y las expresiones faciales de los personas, se captura el progreso gradual de las emociones y labores antes, durante y después del paso de un huracán.

El diseño del libro y yuxtaposición del texto, las ilustraciones y los espacios en blanco proveen una cierta calma dentro una historia que puede hacer recordar a algunos lectores los malos recuerdos, emociones y experiencias vividas.  El libro incluye un glosario de palabras que pueden ser nuevas para los pequeños lectores y que están resaltadas en negrillas (bold) dentro del texto a lo largo de la historia.

El arte consiste de ilustraciones sencillas presentadas con aire de inocencia. Pintados de acuarela, los dibujos resaltan, gracias a una gama amplia de colores y tonos. Además se utilizan bordes bien definidos, semejantes en estilo a los de los comics. Aunque se nota que los paisajes naturales suelen inclinarse a lo sobresimplificado, la mayoría de las ilustraciones emparejan a la historia perfectamente.

Más que nada, la ilustradora brilla en sus representaciones de los personajes. Las caras son distintas, como también son los detalles de la ropa, los zapatos, los sombreros, los peinados, las gafas de sol, y otros artículos. Es una fiesta para los ojos. El efecto visual es encantador y sirve bien para entretener a los lectores de cualquier edad.

Una nota de la autora y/o la ilustradora hubiera ayudado a brindar un poco de contexto a la historia y para los lectores no familiarizados con huracanes o el Huracán María. Pero también puede verse como una historia que puede plasmarse y presentarse en relación a otros huracanes, desastres naturales y experiencias.

 

Laura Rexach Olivencia es consultora en filantropía estratégica y combina su perspectiva de madre puertorriqueña con su experiencia en negocios y pasión por la educación para ayuda a adelantar proyectos que inspiran. Vive en San Juan, Puerto Rico con su esposo y tres hijos pequeños.

 

 

 

Mya Pagán es una ilustradora puertorriqueña. Completó un Bachillerato en Lenguas Extranjeras de la UPR de Río Piedras con concentración en francés e italiano. Además de su pasión por los idiomas, siempre le ha encantado dibujar y traducir lo que la rodea y lo que siente a papel. Actualmente trabaja como ilustradora a tiempo completo y ha trabajado con varias agencias.

Book Review: Lowriders Blast from the Past, written by Cathy Camper, Illustrated by Raúl the Third

Reviewed by David Bowles

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK: When new friends Lupe, Flapjack, and Elirio are each bullied by Los Matamoscas, they know they’re going to like one another. When they find out they all love lowrider cars, they know they’ll be friends for life. But the bullies won’t leave the Lowriders alone—and they don’t let any girls or babies into car clubs. Can these three determined outcasts prove they deserve to be in the car show? Humor, Spanish words, and lowrider culture come together in this heartwarming graphic novel of three friends navigating the bumpy terrain of friendship, bullying, and standing up for what you believe in.

MY TWO CENTS: The third book in Cathy Camper and Raúl the Third’s wonderful Lowriders graphic novel series may seem at first to break with the genre of the previous installments by giving us an origin story, but the series has already established itself as genre-bending, going from sci-fi to mythological adventure. A bit of historical fiction seems to fit nicely in the creators’ wide-ranging work. It’s lots of fun and uplifting to see young versions of our heroes push back against the sexism of Los Matamoscas, a group of bullies who have been making the kids’ lives difficult. It happens that these overly macho men also dictate the ad-hoc rules of a popular car show so they can bar women from competing. As the women in question are furthermore queer (Mamá Impala and Mamá Gazelle, Lupe’s two mothers), the affirmation and representation of marginalized, intersectional identity is particularly poignant.

Just as in life, the hurdles male bullies set for the women are ridiculous (cross speed bumps without scraping the bottom of car, make sure a 5-gallon jar of agua fresca doesn’t spill during a full lap, paint car with no visible brush strokes). But the three new friends (united as allies of the women and victims of Los Matamoscas’ bullying) use their individual skill sets to beat the gang at their own game. Along the way, they earn the respect (and possibly friendship) of some of the macho dudes.

Along with Raúl’s amazing ball-point art (he brings green in this time!) and the linguistic exploration of Spanish and indigenous languages, Lowriders Blast from the Past takes advantage of its historical setting to introduce young readers (and old) to Chicano art of the 70s and 80s, specifically the work of ASCO (great name, heh), an East Los Angeles art collective that was active between 1972 and 1987. Raúl’s recreations of some of their signature pieces was a highlight for me, showcasing just how diverse his talents are. (Full disclosure: he and I have been working on a graphic novel together.)

Camper deftly defies the stylistic patterns that a middle-grade book might normally default to, and if the storyline itself is comfortably predictable, the execution (with its edifying digressions and code-switching) is one-of-a-kind and culturally spot-on.

I loved this volume, and can’t wait to see what adventures Lupe, Flapjack, and Elirio go on next!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Cathy Camper is the author of Lowriders in Space, Lowriders to the Center of the Earth and Lowriders Blast from the Past, with a fourth volume in the works, all from Chronicle Books. She has a forthcoming picture book, Ten Ways to Hear Snow (Dial/Penguin), and also wrote Bugs Before Time: Prehistoric Insects and Their Relatives (Simon & Schuster). Her zines include Sugar Needle and The Lou Reeder, and she’s a founding member of the Portland Women of Color zine collective. A graduate of VONA/Voices writing workshops for people of color in Berkeley, California, Cathy works as a librarian in Portland, Oregon, where she does outreach to schools and kids in grades K-12. Cathy is represented by Jennifer Laughran of Andrea Brown Literary Agency. For insights on the creative originas of the Lowriders series, read Cathy’s Camper’s guest post.

 

ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATOR: Raúl the Third is an award-winning illustrator, author, and artist living in Boston. His work centers on the contemporary Mexican-American experience and his memories of growing up in El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Lowriders in Space was nominated for a Texas BlueBonnet award in 2016-2017 and Raúl was awarded the prestigious Pura Belpré Award for Illustration by the American Library Association for Lowriders to the Center of the Earth. He was also a contributor to the SpongeBob Comics series. Raúl wrote and illustrated the picture book ¡Vamos! Let’s Go to The Market!, which Versify will publish on April 2. For a fun and lively conversation about art, comics, growing up in El Paso and more, check out this one-of-a-kind audio interview with Raúl, conducted by illustrator Roberto Trujillo.

ABOUT THE REVIEWER: A Mexican-American author from deep South Texas, David Bowles is an assistant professor at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. Recipient of awards from the American Library Association, Texas Institute of Letters and Texas Associated Press, he has written a dozen or so books, including Flower, Song, Dance: Aztec and Mayan Poetry, the critically acclaimed Feathered Serpent, Dark Heart of Sky: Mexican Myths, and They Call Me Güero: A Border Kid’s Poems. In 2019, Penguin will publish The Chupacabras of the Rio Grande, co-written with Adam Gidwitz, and Tu Books will release his steampunk graphic novel Clockwork Curandera. His work has also appeared in multiple venues such as Journal of Children’s Literature, Rattle, Strange Horizons, Apex Magazine, Nightmare, Asymptote, Translation Review, Metamorphoses, Huizache, Eye to the Telescope, and Southwestern American Literature. In April 2017, David was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters for his literary work.

January and February 2019 Latinx Book Deals

 

Compiled by Cecila Cackley

This is a bi-monthly series keeping track of the book deals announced by Latinx writers and illustrators. The purpose of this series is to celebrate book deals by authors and illustrators in our community and to advocate for more of them. If you are an agent and you have a Latinx client who just announced a deal, you can let me know on Twitter, @citymousedc. If you are a Latinx author or illustrator writing for children or young adults, and you just got a book deal, send me a message and we will celebrate with you! And if I left anyone out here, please let me know! Here’s to many more wonderful books in the years to come.

 

February 28

None.

February 26

Melanie Cordova at Candlewick has bought world rights to Laurenne Sala‘s (l.) picture book, Mi Casa Is My Home, a bilingual celebration of home and family starring Lucía who lives en su casa with her big, loud, beautiful familia. Zara Gonzalez Hoang will illustrate; publication is set for fall 2021. Kelly Sonnack at the Andrea Brown Literary Agency represented the author, and Andrea Morrison at Writers House represented the illustrator.

 

Karen Boss at Charlesbridge has acquired world rights to We Laugh Alike/Nos reímos igual, written by three-time Pura Belpré Honor author Carmen T. Bernier-Grand (l.), illustrated by Alyssa Bermudez. Written in English and Spanish and based on the author’s experiences as an immigrant, the picture book is about the sense of wonderment when children make connections across language barriers. Publication is planned for spring 2021; Stefanie Sanchez Von Borstel at Full Circle Literary represented the author, and Claire Easton at Painted Words represented the illustrator.

February 21

Cheryl Klein at Lee & Low Books has acquired Miosotis Flores Never Forgets by Hilda Eunice Burgos (Ana María Reyes Does Not Live in a Castle). In this middle grade novel, Miosotis struggles with her growing distance from her college-aged sister, until her work with an abandoned dog at a local animal rescue leads her to realize her sister may be experiencing similar abuse. Publication is set for 2020; the author was unagented.

 

Lee Wade at Random House/Schwartz & Wade has acquired world rights to Areli’s Story by DACA recipient Areli Morales Romero (l.), illustrated by Luisa Uribe, an autobiographical picture book about the author’s immigration to America from Mexico at age six. Publication is scheduled for spring 2021; Brenda Bowen at Sanford J. Greenburger Associates represented the author, and Anne Armstrong at the Bright Agency represented the artist.

 

Mary Kate Castellani at Bloomsbury has acquired world rights to Book Magic by Kate Messner (l.), a picture book that celebrates the magic of books for readers at any age. Ana Ramírez González will illustrate; publication is scheduled for fall 2020. Jennifer Laughran at Andrea Brown Literary Agency represented the author, and Andrea Morrison at Writers House represented the illustrator.

February 14

Kate Fletcher at Candlewick has acquired world rights to Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site author Sherri Duskey Rinker‘s (l.) picture book Joy Ride, illustrated by Ana Ramírez González, in which a girl realizes that creativity can take courage when she’s teased about the fancy bike she built with her grandfather. Publication is slated for spring 2021; Lori Kilkelly at LK Literary Agency represented the author, and Andrea Morrison at Writers House represented the illustrator.

 

Reka Simonsen at Atheneum has acquired world rights to a new picture book by the team behind the Pura Belpré Award-winning Drum Dream Girl: Margarita Engle and Rafael López. Dancing Hands is the story of Teresa Carreño, a child prodigy refugee from Venezuela who played piano for President Abraham Lincoln. Publication is set for August 2019; Michelle Humphrey at the Martha Kaplan Agency represented the author, and Adriana Domínguez and Stefanie Sanchez Von Borstel at Full Circle Literary represented the artist.

February 12

Reka Simonsen at Atheneum has bought world rights to Young People’s Poet Laureate and Newbery Honor author Margarita Engle‘s (l.) A Song of Frutas, illustrated by Sara Palacios, about the poignant relationship between a girl and her grandfather who is a pregonero—a singing vendor who walks the streets of Cuba. Publication is planned for summer 2020; Michelle Humphrey at the Martha Kaplan Agency represented the author, and Kendra Marcus at BookStop Literary represented the illustrator.

 

Louise May at Lee & Low has acquired world rights to Sandra Nickel‘s Nacho’s Nachos, the true story of Ignacio Anaya and the invention of nachos, illustrated by Oliver Dominguez. Publication is planned for spring 2020 to coincide with the 80th anniversary of the invention of this popular snack; Victoria Wells Arms at Wells Arms Literary/Hannigan Salky Getzler represented the author, and Abigail Samoun at Red Fox Literary represented the illustrator.

February 7

Rosemary Brosnan at HarperCollins has acquired two new YA novels by Elizabeth Acevedo, author of the NBA and Printz Award winner The Poet X. The first, Clap When You Land, is a dual narrative novel in verse about two girls who learn of each other, and discover that they are half-sisters, after their father’s death in a plane crash. The first book will publish in spring 2020; Ammi-Joan Paquette at Erin Murphy Literary Agency brokered the deal for North American rights.

 

Kendra Levin at Viking has bought, at auction, Patrice Caldwell‘s YA speculative fiction anthology A Phoenix First Must Burn. The collection features stories centering Black girls and gender nonconforming teens by Elizabeth Acevedo, Amerie, Dhonielle Clayton, Jalissa Corrie, Somaiya Daud, Charlotte Davis, Alaya Dawn Johnson, Justina Ireland, Danny Lore, L.L. McKinney, Danielle Paige, Rebecca Roanhorse, Karen Strong, Ashley Woodfolk, and Ibi Zoboi. Publication is slated for spring 2020; Pete Knapp at Park Literary negotiated the deal for world English rights.

 

Whitney Leopard at Random House Graphic has acquired world rights to Jose Pimienta‘s YA graphic novel Suncatcher. The story, which began as a Kickstarter, follows Beatriz, a young musician growing up in Mexicali who learns that her grandfather’s soul is trapped in his guitar; she goes on a journey to discover the truth about her grandfather’s life while at the same time learning a few truths about herself. Publication is planned for 2021; Pimienta was unagented.

 

Andrea Tompa at Candlewick has won at auction world rights to I’ll Go and Come Back by Rajani LaRocca (l.), illustrated by Sara Palacios. A tribute to long-distance family relationships and cross-cultural connections, the story follows a girl on a trip to India. When she finds herself homesick, her grandmother knows the cure, and the girl knows just how to welcome her grandmother when she visits the U.S. Publication is slated for spring 2022; Brent Taylor at Triada US represented the author, and Kendra Marcus and Minju Chang at Bookstop Literary represented the illustrator.

February 5

None.

January 31

None.

January 24

Nancy Paulsen at Penguin/Paulsen has acquired world rights to Talia Aikens-Nuñez‘s (l.) bilingual picture book, Sueñito/Little Nap, illustrated by Argentinian artist Natalia Colombo. The book is about the simple activities that tire baby out and lead to a small, sweet nap. Publication is set for spring 2021. Author agent: Susan Graham at Einstein Literary Management. Illustrator agent: Mela Bolinao at MB Artists.

January 17

Elise Howard at Algonquin preempted world English and Spanish-language rights to Yamile Saied Méndez‘s Furia, pitched in the vein of Bend It Like Beckham. Set in Argentina, the story centers on Camila “Furia” Hassan, who longs to play professional soccer in the United States and not only has to contend with deeply disapproving parents, but with a blossoming love interest that threatens to tempt her away from her dream. Publication is planned for 2020. Author agent: Linda Camacho at Gallt & Zacker Literary.

January 15

Olivia Valcarce at Scholastic has bought Yamile Saied Méndez‘s Random Acts of Kittens, in which a girl tries to spread happiness by pairing a litter of kittens with the perfect owners, but realizes that her good intentions don’t always yield the results she expects. Publication is slated for 2020. Author agent: Linda Camacho at Gallt and Zacker Literary Agency.

January 10

Tamar Mays at HarperCollins has acquired world rights to Erin Dealey‘s (l.) picture book, Dear Earth… From Your Friends in Room 5, illustrated by Luisa Uribe, recipient of the 2018 Society of Illustrators Dilys Evans Founder’s Award. What begins as a monthly exchange of ideas between Earth and Room 5 grows into a lasting friendship, a school club with a surprising president, and—hopefully—lifelong earth-smart habits. Publication is slated for winter 2021. Illustrator agent:  James Burns at the Bright Agency.

January 8

Cassandra Pelham Fulton and David Saylor at Scholastic/Graphix have acquired, in a 10-house auction, Miss Quinces and an untitled middle grade graphic novel by Kat Fajardo. Miss Quinces features Sue, a Honduran-American girl who, instead of going to sleepaway camp with her friends, gets stuck visiting family in Honduras and having a surprise quinceañera, which is the last thing Sue wants—until she grows to appreciate both her family and their traditions. Simultaneous publication in both English and Spanish is planned for 2020. Author agent: Linda Camacho at Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency.

January 2

Asia Citro at Innovation Press has acquired world rights to Your Name Is a Song, a picture book by Mommy’s Khimar author Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow (l.). Saddened by her classmates’ and teacher’s mispronunciations of her name, a girl is empowered by her discovery that names are like songs when she and her mom celebrate the musicality of African, Asian, Black-American, Latinx, and Middle Eastern names. Luisa Uribe will illustrate; publication is set for summer 2020. Illustrator agent: Alex Gehringer at the Bright Agency.

 

 

cecilia-02-originalCecilia Cackley is a Mexican-American playwright and puppeteer based in Washington, DC. A longtime bookseller, she is currently the Children’s/YA buyer and event coordinator for East City Bookshop on Capitol Hill. Find out more about her art at www.ceciliacackley.com or follow her on Twitter @citymousedc